Monday, November 26, 2012

Blog Post #5: My literacy rich classroom...

This semester I have been surprised by the literacy levels of my students. They are able to read most modern texts and answer guided questions. They are generally not able to decipher texts with higher level reading and have a hard time using context to figure out unfamiliar words.

Journal: September 30, 2013
My literacy rich class looks like reading historical texts and primary documents is engrained in the curriculum. There is ample opportunity for students to have  guided and strategic reading in class. My students are engaged in group reading activities such as jigsaws and chunking. They are reading excerpts from Aristotle and the Enlightenment Philosophers as well as the text book.

Journal: December 15, 2013
My literacy rich class looks like reading primary sources and the discussion of the authors of said sources inform my students about the era we are learning about. My students are engaged in group reading exercises like jigsaws and also poster presentations. They are reading primary sources from the age of new Imperialism. They are writing a modified document based question in which they will answer: "Is Imperialism good or bad?" while using the document to support their decisions. They are discussing this DBQ prompt in a debate during class today.

Journal: May 20, 2014
My literacy rich classroom looks like the students are using primary sources to support arguments about the Cold War. The students are engaged in primary source annotation and analysis and will use this skill to both write an essay and create a visual representation in the form of a propaganda poster. They are capable of independent learning in reading historical texts, researching on the internet and formulating an argument reinforced with primary source evidence.

Sunday, November 11, 2012

EDSS 521 Blog Post #4: Project Tommorow

Speak Up Reports: Learning in the 21st Century Mobile Devices + Social Media = Personalized Learning.

I found this report to be interesting and idealistically agree with its message; mobile devices and social media can make education a personal experience for learners. In the report there is a lot of statistics that show the prevalence of mobile devices among students, teachers, parents and administrators, which I found a little surprising. I have quite a few students who's family does not have the internet of even a cell phone. One thing that I did not find surprising was the list of issues that prevent Principals from changing their "no device" policies. I have all of these same concerns, chief among them is the issue of equity.

Videos from Speak Up: Dear Mr. President

I chose to watch the Dear Mr. President video from the Speak Up selection and found many of the students Ideas to be compelling. I was surprised by the amount of students who wanted changes to be made to the way that teachers are hired and paid. This was something I did not expect students to be concerned with.  I particularly liked the idea of doing away with standardized testing as it exists now and found the girl's story about her freshman class "learning for the test" to be indicative of the No Child Left Behind education system. I will apply some of the things that the students asked for by being enthusiastic, challenging them and incorporating technology in my lessons whenever possible.

Youth Teach 2 Learn Program

I really liked this idea and would try to get a similar program, club or group of students by taking advantage of the extra opportunities the "4x4" schedule allows for students by means of electives. By setting up an elective course specifically designed for student teaching, I could have a 1:30-2 hour block everyday to teach the students and have the students go to an elementary school within the district to teach younger students. The benefits would be that it would inspire younger students and teach the high school students about content mastery, teaching, public speaking and community building.

Thursday, November 8, 2012

Unit Plan: Nationalinsm and WWI (Week 1)



UNIT TOPIC:  Unit 5: Nationalism and WWI (Week 1 of 2.5) (Begins Week 12 of 16)

1. UNIT CONTEXT      

Subject/Content Area: WWI (CA Content Standards 10.5 and 10.6)

Course: World History  

Grade Level: 10th         

Length of Unit: 2.5 weeks/13 days/1:29 minute class periods        

2. FACTS ABOUT THE LEARNERS      

Whole Class Information

·         Number of students in class 41 students
·         Demographic Information: The class is primarily comprised of Caucasian and Hispanic students, but two of the students are of Asian descent. The gender ratio is 19 female to 22 male students. Of the 41 students, the majority are in 10th grade, however, there are five 11th and two 12th graders retaking the class. There are 4 designated ELLs in the class, all of which are classified as CELDT 4s and a couple re-designated students as well. Most of the aforementioned students are at least verbally bilingual. Two of the students have a 504, one because of a prosthetic leg and mild hearing loss, the other because of cancer. One student, a senior retaking the class, has an IEP for specific learning disabilities in reading and writing. Another student has been diagnosed with ADHD but does not have an IEP.  
·         Developmental Needs: All of the students have the prerequisite knowledge and skill required for this class. The majority of the students are audio/visual, social and kinesthetic learners. Some of the interests of the students in the class are socializing, skateboarding, soccer, drawing and two of them are also involved in team sports for the school (water polo and tennis). Some affective management styles for this class are discipline with dignity and assertive discipline. The teachers promote a learning environment that is respectful and open minded. The students are seated at four person tables in order to encourage discussion and promote teamwork during class.

Individual Student Information and Differentiation Strategies

Rogelio:
·         CELDT 4
·         11th Grade
·         Hispanic (Mexican), Male, Spanish Speaker/ELL
·         Retaking the class because of low homework completion
·         Often makes excellent connections with the content and asks good questions
·         Interested in skateboarding and socializing
·         Developmental needs: Readiness level on par with the rest of the class. Additional support for writing assignment is helpful. He seems to be a social and kinesthetic learner.
·         Learning Goal: Students will be able to formulate and effectively write an argumentative essay by the end of the term. This essay will include a context paragraph and body paragraphs with concrete evidence as well as a conclusion
·         Progress Monitoring Assessment for Unit 5: Historical Context and “T.A.X.E.S.” Paragraphs, graded with a rubric.
·         Differentiation:
o   Content: Notes and lectures are provided for him on the class website.
o   Process: Group and hands on activities whenever possible. Teachers check for understanding and assistance often.
o   Product: Assignments graded with rubrics that reflect the requirements of the assignments. In compliance with the SDAIE model, all instruction is given at the CELDT 5 level.
o   Affect: Assertive Discipline with group and hands on activities whenever possible. Feedback given verbally and on rubrics
o   Learning Environment: Tables of 4 students, does best with students who are typically on task and not prone to talking. Table placement on the outside of the cluster of tables (but not necessarily in front) is desirable for teacher accessibility.

Alondra:
·         CELDT 4
·         11th Grade
·         Hispanic (Mexican), Female, Spanish Speaker/ELL
·         Interested in art and socializing
·         Wants to be a tattoo artist after high school
·         Developmental needs: Readiness level on par with the rest of the class. Additional support for writing assignment is helpful. She seems to be a social and audio/visual learner.
·         Learning Goal: Students will be able to formulate and effectively write an argumentative essay by the end of the term. This essay will include a context paragraph and body paragraphs with concrete evidence as well as a conclusion
·         Progress Monitoring Assessment for Unit 5: Historical Context and “T.A.X.E.S.” Paragraphs, graded with a rubric.
·         Differentiation:
o   Content: Notes and lectures are provided for her on the class website. Graphic Organizers are used often.
o   Process: Group activities and graphic organizers whenever possible. Teachers check for understanding and assistance often.
o   Product: Assignments graded with rubrics that reflect the requirements of the assignments. In compliance with the SDAIE model, all instruction is given at the CELDT 5 level.
o   Affect: Assertive Discipline with group activities and graphic organizers whenever possible. Feedback given verbally and on rubrics
o   Learning Environment: Tables of 4 students, does best with students who are typically on task, and not prone to talking. Seems to socialize more readily with other girls than boys. Often “hides” during discussion, use cold calling techniques with her. Table placement near the front.
McRae:
·         IEP: Specific Learning Disabilities in Reading and Writing
·         12th Grade
·         Hispanic/Asian, Male
·         He is adopted and has a sister who also attends SDA
·         Retaking the class because of very low homework completion
·         Readily and frequently shares his opinions and ideas with the class. Makes valuable connections to the content
·         Interested in military history and the United States Marine Corps (already enlisted)
·         Developmental needs: Readiness level on par with the rest of the class. Additional support for reading and writing assignments is helpful. He seems to be a audio/visual and kinesthetic learner.
·         Learning Goal: Students will be able to formulate and effectively write an argumentative essay by the end of the term. This essay will include a context paragraph and body paragraphs with concrete evidence as well as a conclusion
·         Progress Monitoring Assessment for Unit 5: Historical Context and “T.A.X.E.S.” Paragraphs, graded with a rubric.
·         Differentiation:
o   Content: Notes and lectures are provided for him on the class website. His IEP dictates that he must have additional time to turn in assignments
o   Process: If possible, give him shorter reading materials or a longer time to read them. Teachers check for understanding and assistance often.
o   Product: Assignments graded with rubrics that reflect the requirements of the assignments. He is allowed to turn in assignments a few classes late with no penalty. He is encouraged to type writing assignment whenever possible. Additional reminders about homework often seem effective.
o   Affect: Assertive Discipline. Feedback given verbally and on rubrics
o   Learning Environment: Tables of 4 students, does best with students who are typically on task. Table placement on the outside of the cluster of tables is desirable for teacher accessibility. Additionally, because he drives discussion, he does well near the back of the class, this pushes the student between McRae and the teacher to be more engaged as well.  
Jake:
·         504: Prosthetic Leg and mild hearing loss
·         10th Grade
·         Caucasian, Male
·         Introverted, will not share unless called on
·         In 7th grade, he was diagnosed with osteosarcoma, which resulted in the amputation of one of his legs.
·         Interested in snowboarding, wakeboarding and socializing
·         Developmental needs: Readiness level on par with the rest of the class. Additional support for writing assignment is helpful. He seems to be an audio/visual learner. He benefits from group work but often will not readily contribute without prompting.
·         Learning Goal: Students will be able to formulate and effectively write an argumentative essay by the end of the term. This essay will include a context paragraph and body paragraphs with concrete evidence as well as a conclusion
·         Progress Monitoring Assessment for Unit 5: Historical Context and “T.A.X.E.S.” Paragraphs, graded with a rubric.
·         Differentiation:
o   Content: Notes and lectures are provided for him on the class website. Graphic Organizers are used often.
o   Process: Graphic Organizers and Group activities whenever possible. Teachers check for understanding and assistance often with additional monitoring to insure participation.
o   Product: Assignments graded with rubrics that reflect the requirements of the assignments.
o   Affect: Assertive Discipline with graphic organizers, videos and group activities whenever possible. Feedback given verbally and on rubrics
o   Learning Environment: Tables of 4 students, does best with students who are typically on task. Will prove challenging to keep on task if grouped with “skaters. ” Table placement near the front of the class.
Nikolas:
·         10th Grade
·         Caucasian, Male
·         Interested in BBC, anime, Japanese and drawing
·         Developmental needs: Readiness level on par with the rest of the class. Additional support for writing assignment is helpful. He seems to be an audio/visual and kinesthetic learner. He benefits from group work but often will not readily contribute without prompting.
·         Very introverted, will not share or participate unless prompted
·         Doodles on the vast majority of his assignments and supplies
·         Learning Goal: Students will be able to formulate and effectively write an argumentative essay by the end of the term. This essay will include a context paragraph and body paragraphs with concrete evidence as well as a conclusion
·         Progress Monitoring Assessment for Unit 5: Historical Context and “T.A.X.E.S.” Paragraphs, graded with a rubric.
·         Differentiation:
o   Content: Notes and lectures are provided for him on the class website. Graphic Organizers are used often.
o   Process: Graphic Organizers and hands-on activities whenever possible. Teachers check for understanding and assistance often with additional monitoring to insure participation. Any assignment in which allows him to draw is excellent.
o   Product: Assignments graded with rubrics that reflect the requirements of the assignments.
o   Affect: Assertive Discipline with graphic organizers, videos and hands on activities whenever possible. Feedback given verbally and on rubrics
o   Learning Environment: Tables of 4 students, does best with students who are typically on task. Table placement directly up front seems to encourage the best results.

2. Unit Rationale: Enduring Understandings & Essential Questions

 

Enduring Understandings (EU)

Nationalism (10.2.5, 10.5, 10.9, 10.10) Explain the ideological forces that drove the change from people feeling as if they are subjects of a political authority to people feeling as if they are citizens of a political entity and how that change affects a nation’s sphere of influence.

Global Conflicts including WWI & WWII (10.5, 10.6 and 10.8, 10.9.8) Explain how nationalism pushes industrialization, imperialism, and alliances into the first global conflict (WWI), and how unresolved issues caused additional global conflicts, and what steps were taken to avoid additional global conflicts. Explain how nationalism impacts the scope and scale of war.

Unit Specific Enduring Understanding:
Students will understand that although World War 1 was believed to be the “War to End All Wars”, the treaty made at the end of WWI would be responsible for the rise of European dictators and, ultimately, WWII.
·         The causes of WWI are still responsible for wars we fight today.
·         Each war has new and more dangerous weapons leading to more deaths. 
·         After WWI, the U.S. is on the map as a major world power.
·         Students need to be aware of the propaganda that they encounter on a daily basis.

 

Essential Questions

1. Explain the 6 factors that make up nationalism. How did nationalism in the 1800’s challenge conservative monarchies in Europe? How did nationalism lead people to either unify or separate to create their own nation-states? Facet 1: Explanation

2. Explain the 4 causes of/driving forces behind World War I and how each of the causes contributed to the start of the war. Facet 1: Explanation

3. Why was WWI a “new kind of war” unlike any that had preceded it?  What were the new modern aspects and how did they come to characterize WWI?  Consider the impact they had on the different fronts of the war as well as the role they played in the outcome of the war. Explain why and how WWI spread to several to continents and required the resources of many governments. Facet 3: Application

4. Discuss the steps taken by the victorious Allies after WWI to prevent a similar conflict from occurring in the future. Evaluate to what degree they were achieved at the Paris Peace Conference and in the resulting Treaty of Versailles. Facet 1: Explanation

Reason for the Instructional Strategies & Student Activities

3. STANDARDS

Content Standards

10.2.5 Discuss how nationalism spread across Europe with Napoleon but was repressed for a generation under the Congress of Vienna and Concert of Europe until the Revolutions of 1848.

10.5 Students analyze the causes and course of the First World War.
1.      Analyze the arguments for entering into war presented by leaders from all sides of the Great War and the role of political and economic rivalries, ethnic and ideological conflicts, domestic discontent and disorder, and propaganda and nationalism in mobilizing the civilian population in support of “total war.”
2.      Examine the principal theaters of battle, major turning points, and the importance of geographic factors in military decisions and outcomes (e.g., topography, waterways, distance, climate).
3.      Explain how the Russian Revolution and the entry of the United States affected the course and outcome of the war.
4.      Understand the nature of the war and its human costs (military and civilian) on all sides of the conflict, including how colonial peoples contributed to the war effort.

10.6 Students analyze the effects of the First World War.
1.      Analyze the aims and negotiating roles of world leaders, the terms and influence of the Treaty of Versailles and Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points, and the causes and effects of the United States’ rejection of the League of Nations on world politics.
2.      Describe the effects of the war and resulting peace treaties on population movement, the international economy, and shifts in the geographic and political borders of Europe and the Middle East.
3.      Understand the widespread disillusionment with prewar institutions, authorities, and values that resulted in a void that was later filled by totalitarians.
4.      Discuss the influence of World War I on literature, art, and intellectual life in the West (e.g., Pablo Picasso, the “lost generation” of Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway).

10.10 Students analyze instances of nation-building in the contemporary world in at least two of the following regions or countries: the Middle East, Africa, Mexico and other parts of Latin America, and China.

 

ELD Standards

Choose 1-3 standards or frameworks that your unit will address.
Listening and Speaking:
Cluster 2
A: Identify strategies used by the media to present information for various purposes (e.g., to inform, entertain, or persuade). [Propaganda]

Reading Fluency & Systematic Vocabulary Development:
Cluster 4
A: Recognize that some words have multiple meanings and apply this knowledge consistently in reading literature and texts in content areas.
Cluster 6
A: Use a standard dictionary to determine the meaning of unknown words.

4. UNIT OBJECTIVES

Day 1: While watching the film Gandhi (1982), the students will fill out a graphic organizer that pertains to the film and its connection to the ideas of Imperialism and Nationalism. The graphic organizer will be collected after the film is completed along with the assignment from day 2.

Content Standards: 10.2.5, 10.5, 10.10 (Standards pertaining to Nationalism)
Type: Cognitive and Affective

Day 2: After completing Gandhi (1982) and the graphic organizer, the students will answer “How did the idea of Nationalism contribute to the independence of India from the British Empire and the creation of Pakistan?” in the form of a historical context paragraph and a T.A.X.E.S. paragraph. They must include an explanation of Nationalism and at least three examples with commentary from the film. The students will be given time in class to begin working on the writing assignment and will be asked to complete and revise it for homework. This assignment will be collected on Day 3 along with the graphic organizer they completed while watching the film and will be graded using a rubric.

Content Standards: 10.2.5, 10.5, 10.10 (Standards pertaining to Nationalism)
Type: Language

Day 3: After the students take notes on a brief lecture about the six factures of Nationalism, the students will break into groups and create a poster of a predetermined factor of nationalism (language, history, geography, religion, culture and ethnicity). Each poster must include a definition, an example, a visual representation and a prediction about how it could have led to WWI. The students will then present their posters to the rest of the class.

Content Standard: 10.2.5, 10.5, 10.9, 10.10 (Standards pertaining to Nationalism)
Type: Cognitive

Day 4: After reading Chapter 13.1 in their textbook for homework and taking notes on a brief lecture regarding the four major causes of World War 1, the students will discuss the causes of World War 1 in their table groups and complete a Graphic Organizer for the four causes. The graphic organizer must be completed by the end of the period. Finally, the students will contribute to a class discussion.

Content Standard: 10.5.1,2
Type: Cognitive

Day 5: After completing their New Technology “Meme”/Captioned Picture assignment for homework, the students will do a gallery walk around the room while compiling a “Top Ten Most Important List” each entry should include the New Technology, its creator (if applicable) and why it changed the way wars were fought forever.

Content Standard: 10.5.1,2,4
Type Cognitive

5. ASSESSMENT PLAN

Assessment 1: Gandhi (1982) Graphic Organizer
o   Standard: 10.2.5, 10.5, 10.10
o   Formality: Formal
o   Type: Entry level
o   Purpose: Concepts
o   Implementation: Written, graphic organizer
o   Communication of Expectations: Modeling
o   Evaluation: Graded by completion

Assessment 2: Gandhi (1982) and Nationalism Paragraphs
o   Standard: 10.2.5, 10.5, 10.10
o   Formality: Formal
o   Type: Diagnostic
o   Purpose: Assess progression of writing skills
o   Implementation: Written, Open Ended essay
o   Communication of Expectations: Supports
o   Evaluation: Rubric

Assessment 3: 6 Factors of Nationalism Posters
o   Standard: 10.2.5, 10.5, 10.10
o   Formality: Formal
o   Type: Formative
o   Purpose: Concepts
o   Implementation: Written/Performance
o   Communication of Expectations: Modeling
o   Evaluation: Rubric (see attached)

Assessment 4: 4 Causes of WWI Graphic Organizer
o   Standard: 10.5.1
o   Formality: Formal
o   Type: Diagnostic
o   Purpose: Concepts
o   Implementation: Written, graphic organizer
o   Communication of Expectations: Modeling
o   Evaluation: Graded by Completion

Assessment 5: “Meme”/Captioned Picture
o   Standard: 10.5.1,2,4
o   Formality: Formal
o   Type: Formative
o   Purpose: Concepts
o   Implementation: Open, Project
o   Communication of Expectations: Modeling
o   Evaluation: Graded by Completion of Requirements

6. STEPS OF INSTRUCTION

Into/Bridge: Day 1 and 2
The Purpose of showing the film Gandhi (1982) as my Into for the unit  is to illustrate the correlation between Imperialism and Nationalism while providing a hook and to promote some emotional connection to the unit.

Student Activity
We will begin the unit by watching the film Gandhi (1982). The hook of the unit is the film itself which beautifully illustrates the connection between Imperialism and Nationalism and has some elements of WWI as well. This group of students responded very well to the hook from our Industrialization unit, a film called Stolen Childhood. The utilization of this film as a gateway into this unit is an excellent way to motivate the students to want to learn about nationalism and WWI. I will assess prior knowledge by their answers to the questions on the graphic organizer. I will use a variety of different activities and assessments to tap into prior learning and skills to insure that I engage all of the students.
To begin this activity I will pass out the graphic organizer and then begin the film after a pre-brief of what they should be looking for while watching. The arrangement of the tables within the room shall remain the same, however, I will switch the seating chart around. I group students at tables by assessing student needs and who works well with whom. We generally do not have problems with misbehavior while showing films, especially with a new seating chart. However, if a problem should arise I will handle it by following the guidelines depicted in Discipline with Dignity. In order to assess the students learning from the film, I will analyze the T.A.X.E.S. and historical context paragraphs that they submit after the film has been completed. This assessment is a formal, open ended, written assessment designed to further the student writing and critical thinking skills.

Through: See attached Unit Calendar

Closure/Beyond:
            The ultimate closure for the Unit will be the unit test on Day 13, which will be comprised of fill in the black, matching, multiple choice and short essay questions. However, the Beyond activity for the first week of the unit, described above, is the “Meme”/Captioned Picture project scheduled for Day 5. The captioned picture is a short, fun project, which allows the students to jigsaw a collection of data, be creative and make valuable connections. I will structure opportunities for the students to continue practice of skills acquired from is unit and the ones that came before by continuing to have the students build upon their writing skills and content knowledge. I will be preparing the students for the next unit by building their content mastery and having them practice writing and analytical skills with Historical context and T.A.X.E.S. paragraphs. These paragraphs are the building blocks of an academic essay, the completion of which is one of the summative goals of the course.

Beyond Activity Write up:
Standards: 10.5.1,2,4
Learning Objectives: Why was WWI a “new kind of war” unlike any that had preceded it?  What were the new modern aspects and how did they come to characterize WWI?  Consider the impact they had on the different fronts of the war as well as the role they played in the outcome of the war. Explain why and how WWI spread to several to continents and required the resources of many governments.
Activity: New Technology of WWI “Meme” or captioned Picture gallery walk with a list of the student’s top ten most important new technologies
Assessment: New Technology of WWI “Meme” or captioned Picture with Top Ten List

WEEK OF LESSON PLANS
See Attached

7. MATERIALS/RESOURCES

o   Gandhi (1982) DVD
o   Gandhi (1982) Graphic Organizer
o   4 Causes of WWI Graphic Organizer
o   “Meme”/Captioned Picture Directions
o   Poster Presentation Rubric
o   Short lecture on http://prezi.com/61e4adr7gbyj/nationalism/

8. REFLECTION

I chose to do my unit plan for an upcoming unit as opposed to one that I had already done or was in the process of doing. However, I used the method of universal design while creating this plan so that basic differentiation can be made with little to no changes. The use of graphic organizers is a SDAIE strategy and while it benefits English learners greatly, it also can provide help to a native speaker. Furthermore, it allows a teacher to scaffold for his or her students often without them even knowing about it. One individual differentiation I could utilize would be to place an English learner in a group with a bilingual person or a student who is high preforming. I would also be sure to provide additional support to struggling students during the writing assignment. There is a considerable amount of time allotted for that during Day 2.
            One strength of my unit plan is that the activities are fairly diverse, between watching a film and taking notes to class discussions and poster presentations. I have attempted to plan something for every learning style in my class and there are plenty of chances for me to assess my students learning because even in just the first week, I have five assessments. However, there are limitations in my plan as well. While the activities may vary, my assessments are all formal and my purpose for four out of five of them is merely for concepts. I believe the most valuable piece of evidence that I will be able to collect is the writing assignment. By analyzing the levels of each of my student’s writing I will be able to get a firm grasp of not only their content understanding but also but their progression as writers. The posters and the innovation/technology projects will also prove to be valuable for assessing student learning.
            Through this assignment, I have learned that planning a unit is much harder than I had anticipated. Originally, I had planned to write out the entire thirteen days but simply could not find the time to do so. By getting to know my students more, I learned that even among the most seemingly similar students, learning styles and preferences are completely unique and I should be prepared to adjust my lesson plans for any situation. This is something that I will keep in mind for my next lesson. I would also like to figure out a way to incorporate more of their interests into the lessons. I have always loved the WWI era and writing the unit for it is both wonderful and frustrating because of how difficult it is to cut some of the things that I desperately want to talk about but do not have the time for.  I knew very little about the deep realms of teaching before starting the clinical practice. I feel like I have learned the most from the few lead teaching days that I have had in the classroom, however, I feel like I learned a great deal from the unit plan assignment as well.

Unit Calendar: Unit 5: Nationalism and WWI (Week 1: Days 1-5)
WEEK 1
Day 1
Day 2
Day 3
Day 4
Day 5
Content Standards
10.2.5, 10.5, 10.10



10.2.5, 10.5, 10.10


10.2.5, 10.5, 10.10
10.5.1
10.5.1,2,4

Learning Objectives
Nationalism (10.2.5, 10.5, 10.9, 10.10) Explain the ideological forces that drove the change from people feeling as if they are subjects of a political authority to people feeling as if they are citizens of a political entity and how that change affects a nation’s sphere of influence.




Nationalism (10.2.5, 10.5, 10.9, 10.10) Explain the ideological forces that drove the change from people feeling as if they are subjects of a political authority to people feeling as if they are citizens of a political entity and how that change affects a nation’s sphere of influence.
Explain the 6 factors that make up nationalism. How did nationalism in the 1800’s challenge conservative monarchies in Europe? How did nationalism lead people to either unify or separate to create their own nation-states?
Explain the 4 causes of/driving forces behind World War I and how each of the causes contributed to the start of the war.
3. Why was WWI a “new kind of war” unlike any that had preceded it?  What were the new modern aspects and how did they come to characterize WWI?  Consider the impact they had on the different fronts of the war as well as the role they played in the outcome of the war. Explain why and how WWI spread to several to continents and required the resources of many governments.
Student Activity
Into activity Watch the film Gandhi (1982) and complete a graphic organizer

Gandhi (1982) continued. Complete the graphic organizer and write a historical context and TAXES (assertive) paragraph 
Lecture/Notes

6 Factors of Nationalism Group Posters, Presentations
Lecture/Notes

As a group, complete the 4 Causes of WWI Graphic Organizer

Class Discussion
New Technology of WWI “Meme” or captioned Picture gallery walk. Rate the Top Ten.

Class Discussion
Assessment
Gandhi (1982) Graphic Organizer


Gandhi (1982) and Nationalism Paragraphs
6 Factors of Nationalism Posters
4 Causes of WWI graphic Organizer
“Meme”/Captioned Picture

Top Ten List

Single Subject Lesson Design - Box Format

1. TITLE OF THE LESSON
Unit 5: Nationalism and WWI
Day 5: New Technologies and Warfare
2. CURRICULUM AREA & GRADE LEVEL
Grade 10, World History


3A. STUDENT INFORMATION: English Language Learners

1.) Readiness Level
 The 4 EL students in my class are all either classified as CELDT 4 or are re-designated. Thus, instruction is done at CELDT 5 level.
    
2.) Learning Profile
Visual, Auditory learners, most of them are very shy and do not often volunteer for discussions.
     
3.) Interest Soccer, skateboarding and Socializing.

3B. STUDENT INFORMATION: Students w/ Special Needs

1.) Readiness Level
Jake has a prosthetic leg and is moderately hard of hearing. He has all prerequisite knowledge and skill required for this class
    
2.) Learning Profile
Jake should sit near the front of the class and be provided with written copies of notes and directions. He may stand or walk around during class
     
3.) Interest Snowboarding and wakeboarding

4. RATIONALE
A. Enduring Understanding
Students will understand that although World War 1 was believed to be the “War to End All Wars”, the treaty made at the end of WWI would be responsible for the rise of European dictators and, ultimately, WWII.
·         The causes of WWI are still responsible for wars we fight today.
·         Each war has new and more dangerous weapons leading to more deaths. 

B. Essential Questions
Why was WWI a “new kind of war” unlike any that had preceded it?  What were the new modern aspects and how did they come to characterize WWI?  Consider the impact they had on the different fronts of the war as well as the role they played in the outcome of the war. Explain why and how WWI spread to several to continents and required the resources of many governments. (13.2 and 13.3)

C. Reason for Instructional Strategies and Student Activities
Students must understand how WWI was different from every other war that had ever been waged. In part this was due to the new technologies, weapons and strategies developed leading up to and during the war. Students must understand the connection to modern day warfare and the way that it is fought in this very day and age.

5. CONTENT STANDARD(S) 10.5.1,2,4

10.2.5 Discuss how nationalism spread across Europe with Napoleon but was repressed for a generation under the Congress of Vienna and Concert of Europe until the Revolutions of 1848.

10.5 Students analyze the causes and course of the First World War.
·         Analyze the arguments for entering into war presented by leaders from all sides of the Great War and the role of political and economic rivalries, ethnic and ideological conflicts, domestic discontent and disorder, and propaganda and nationalism in mobilizing the civilian population in support of “total war.”
·         Examine the principal theaters of battle, major turning points, and the importance of geographic factors in military decisions and outcomes (e.g., topography, waterways, distance, climate).
·         Explain how the Russian Revolution and the entry of the United States affected the course and outcome of the war.
·         Understand the nature of the war and its human costs (military and civilian) on all sides of the conflict, including how colonial peoples contributed to the war effort.

10.6 Students analyze the effects of the First World War.
1.      Analyze the aims and negotiating roles of world leaders, the terms and influence of the Treaty of Versailles and Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points, and the causes and effects of the United States’ rejection of the League of Nations on world politics.
2.      Describe the effects of the war and resulting peace treaties on population movement, the international economy, and shifts in the geographic and political borders of Europe and the Middle East.
3.      Understand the widespread disillusionment with prewar institutions, authorities, and values that resulted in a void that was later filled by totalitarians.
4.      Discuss the influence of World War I on literature, art, and intellectual life in the West (e.g., Pablo Picasso, the “lost generation” of Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway).

10.10 Students analyze instances of nation-building in the contemporary world in at least two of the following regions or countries: the Middle East, Africa, Mexico and other parts of Latin America, and China.

6. ELD STANDARD(S)

Listening and Speaking:
Cluster 2
A: Identify strategies used by the media to present information for various purposes (e.g., to inform, entertain, or persuade). [Propaganda]

Reading Fluency & Systematic Vocabulary Development:
Cluster 4
A: Recognize that some words have multiple meanings and apply this knowledge consistently in reading literature and texts in content areas.
Cluster 6
A: Use a standard dictionary to determine the meaning of unknown words.

7. LEARNING GOAL(S) - OBJECTIVE(S)
Day 1:
While watching the film Gandhi (1982), the students will fill out a graphic organizer that pertains to the film and its connection to the ideas of Imperialism and Nationalism. The graphic organizer will be collected after the film is completed along with the assignment from day 2.
Content Standards: 10.2.5, 10.5, 10.10 (Standards pertaining to Nationalism)
Type: Cognitive and Affective

Day 2:
After completing Gandhi (1982) and the graphic organizer, the students will answer “How did the idea of Nationalism contribute to the independence of India from the British Empire and the creation of Pakistan?” in the form of a historical context paragraph and a T.A.X.E.S. paragraph. They must include an explanation of Nationalism and at least three examples with commentary from the film. The students will be given time in class to begin working on the writing assignment and will be asked to complete and revise it for homework. This assignment will be collected on Day 3 along with the graphic organizer they completed while watching the film and will be graded using a rubric.
Content Standards: 10.2.5, 10.5, 10.10 (Standards pertaining to Nationalism)
Type: Language

Day 3:
After the students take notes on a brief lecture about the six factures of Nationalism, the students will break into groups and create a poster of a predetermined factor of nationalism (language, history, geography, religion, culture and ethnicity). Each poster must include a definition, an example, a visual representation and a prediction about how it could have led to WWI. The students will then present their posters to the rest of the class.
Content Standard: 10.2.5, 10.5, 10.9, 10.10 (Standards pertaining to Nationalism)
Type: Cognitive

Day 4:
After reading Chapter 13.1 in their textbook for homework and taking notes on a brief lecture regarding the four major causes of World War 1, the students will discuss the causes of World War 1 in their table groups and complete a Graphic Organizer for the four causes. The graphic organizer must be completed by the end of the period. Finally, the students will contribute to a class discussion.
Content Standard: 10.5.1,2
Type: Cognitive

Day 5:
After completing their New Technology “Meme”/Captioned Picture assignment for homework, the students will do a gallery walk around the room while compiling a “Top Ten Most Important List” each entry should include the New Technology, its creator (if applicable) and why it changed the way wars were fought forever.
Content Standard: 10.5.1,2,4
Type Cognitive

8. ASSESSMENT(S)
Assessment 1: Gandhi (1982) Graphic Organizer
o   Standard: 10.2.5, 10.5, 10.10
o   Formality: Formal
o   Type: Entry level
o   Purpose: Concepts
o   Implementation: Written, graphic organizer
o   Communication of Expectations: Modeling
o   Evaluation: Graded by completion

Assessment 2: Gandhi (1982) and Nationalism Paragraphs
o   Standard: 10.2.5, 10.5, 10.10
o   Formality: Formal
o   Type: Diagnostic
o   Purpose: Assess progression of writing skills
o   Implementation: Written, Open Ended essay
o   Communication of Expectations: Supports
o   Evaluation: Rubric

Assessment 3: 6 Factors of Nationalism Posters
o   Standard: 10.2.5, 10.5, 10.10
o   Formality: Formal
o   Type: Formative
o   Purpose: Concepts
o   Implementation: Written/Performance
o   Communication of Expectations: Modeling
o   Evaluation: Rubric (see attached)

Assessment 4: 4 Causes of WWI Graphic Organizer
o   Standard: 10.5.1
o   Formality: Formal
o   Type: Diagnostic
o   Purpose: Concepts
o   Implementation: Written, graphic organizer
o   Communication of Expectations: Modeling
o   Evaluation: Graded by Completion

Assessment 5: “Meme”/Captioned Picture
o   Standard: 10.5.1,2,4
o   Formality: Formal
o   Type: Formative
o   Purpose: Concepts
o   Implementation: Open, Project
o   Communication of Expectations: Modeling
o   Evaluation: Graded by Completion of Requirements

9A. EXPLANATION OF DIFFERENTIATION FOR
ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS

Process/Based on Readiness, Learning Profile or Interest

The differentiations for this week are ingrained within the processes of the activities. The use of graphic organizers, teacher scaffolding and class time to work on assignments are a crucial part of the universal designs for the unit.  

9B. EXPLANATION OF DIFFERENTIATION FOR
STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

Process/Based on Readiness, Learning Profile or Interest

The differentiations for this week are ingrained within the processes of the activities. The use of graphic organizers, teacher scaffolding and class time to work on assignments are a crucial part of the universal designs for the unit. 

10. INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
(Describe what the teacher does. Include differentiation strategies.)

Day 1:
A. Anticipatory Set/Into
Teacher introduces the film Gandhi 1982 and discusses the connections between Imperialism (the unit we just finished) and Nationalism. Before beginning the film, pass out the Gandhi 1982 Graphic Organizer and explain that the students should be watching for specific examples of Imperialistic and Nationalistic elements. Start the film.

D. Independent Practice/Through
Have the students fill out the Gandhi 1982 Graphic Organizer while watching the film

Day 2:
A. Anticipatory Set/Into
Teacher recaps the portion of the film that was completed yesterday, has the student take out their graphic organizers and continues the film.

D. Independent Practice/Through
Have the students continue to fill out the Gandhi 1982 graphic organizer while watching the film.

E. Closure
Using their graphic organizers, the teacher will lead a discussion about the film. Be sure to discuss the connections between Imperialism and Nationalism. Introduce the short essay homework assignment.

Day 3:
A. Anticipatory Set/Into
Warm up: The teacher has the students do the following warm up quick write: Based upon what you have observed from the film Gandhi, predict what you think the essential factors of nationalism are. Briefly discuss the student’s responses. (10 minutes)

B. Instruction/Through
Prezi Lecture: Using prezi, lecture about the six factors of Nationalism. (15 minutes) 

D. Independent Practice/Through
Have the students break up into groups and create a poster about a specific factor of Nationalism, (language, history, geography, religion, culture and ethnicity). Each poster must include a definition, an example, a visual representation and a prediction about how it could have led to WWI. While they are doing this, wander from group to group to insure that the students are on the right track. Engage them briefly every ten minutes. After 40-45 minutes, have the students present their posters to the rest of the class. Remind the students to take notes on the presentations. (60-63 minutes)

E. Closure
Introduce the homework: red heading notes on Chapter 13.1 in the textbook. (2 minutes)

Day 4:
A. Anticipatory Set/Into
Warm up: The teacher has the students do the following warm up quick write: Based upon yesterday’s presentations and Chapter 13.1, How do you think that Nationalistic developments could lead to war. Discuss the students’ responses. (15 minutes)

B. Instruction/Through
Prezi Lecture: Using Prezi, lecture about the four main causes of WWI. (20-30 minutes) 

D. Independent Practice/Through
In table groups, have the students complete the 4 Causes of WWI graphic organizer. While the students are doing this, wander from table to table for scaffolding and assistance. (30 minutes)

E. Closure
Introduce the New Technologies/Innovations of WWI Meme homework assignment. Randomly assign the innovations to the students. (10 minutes)

Day 5:
A. Anticipatory Set/Into
Have the students do the following warm-up prediction: Judging from the technology, invention or innovation that you researched last night and the discussions that we have had in class thus far, what other aspects of WWI do you think changed the way that wars had been fought? (10 minutes)

B. Instruction/Through
Explain and write on the whiteboard:
Gallery Walk
1. Take out the “Meme” or Captioned Picture that you did last night and place it on your table.
2. Take out a piece of paper and a pen or pencil.
3. You will have 15 minutes to walk around the room and check out your classmate’s pictures.
4. Create a T-Chart on your paper; make a list of what you consider to be the top ten most important innovations. On one side write the name of the technology, invention or innovation and who invented it (if applicable). On the other, write how it changed the way that wars were fought and why you think it is important.
5. You are not allowed to look at any of the pictures on your own table until you have gone to all nine of the other tables first. (10 minutes)

D. Independent Practice/Through
Give the students 15-20 minutes to go around and look at the innovations/technologies. The teacher should be wandering around checking on the students and directing them during this time. After the time runs out, have them return to their seats (20-25 minutes)
                                     
C. Guided Practice/Through
Have the students share some of their findings and lead a discussion about why these technologies, inventions, etc… were so revolutionary and how they changed how wars were fought and make the connection to modern day. Be sure to discuss propaganda, the tank, trench warfare, mustard gas, the machine gun and the airplane. (20-25 minutes)
                                                                    
E. Closure
On their top ten lists, have the students write their opinion about any of the new weapons or innovations from WWI and explain the homework assignment (Chapter 13. 3 Red heading notes) have the students turn in their “Meme”/captioned pictures and the top ten lists before they live. (10-15 minutes)
11. STUDENT ACTIVITIES
(Describe what the student do. Include differentiation activities.)

Day 1:
A. Anticipatory Set/Into
Students listen to the introduction and directions regarding the film and receive their graphic organizers. Students watch the film.

D. Independent Practice/Through
While watching the film, the students will fill out their graphic organizers.






Day 2:
A. Anticipatory Set/Into
Student will take out their graphic organizers and listen has the teacher recaps the portion of the film that the class has completed thus far.

D. Independent Practice/Through
While watching the film, the students will fill out their graphic organizers.

E. Closure
Lead by the teacher, the students discuss the film, their questions and Imperialism and Nationalism. They also listen to the directions for the short essay homework assignment.




Day 3:
A. Anticipatory Set/Into
Warm up: The students do the following warm up quick write: Based upon what you have observed from the film Gandhi, predict what you think the essential factors of nationalism are. Briefly discuss the student’s responses. (10 minutes)

B. Instruction/Through
Students will take notes about the six factors of Nationalism. (15 minutes)

D. Independent Practice/Through
The students will break up into groups and create a poster about a specific factor of Nationalism, (language, history, geography, religion, culture and ethnicity). After 40-45 minutes, the students will then present their posters to the rest of the class. Remind the students to take notes on the presentations. (60-63 minutes)

E. Closure
Students write down the homework: red heading notes on Chapter 13.1 in the textbook. (2 minutes)






Day 4:
A. Anticipatory Set/Into
Warm up: The students do the following warm up quick write: Based upon yesterday’s presentations and Chapter 13.1, How do you think that Nationalistic developments could lead to war. Discuss their responses as a class. (15 minutes)

B. Instruction/Through
Students will take notes about the four Causes of WWI. (15 minutes)

D. Independent Practice/Through
In table groups, the students will complete the 4 Causes of WWI graphic organizer. (30 minutes)

E. Closure
The students will listen to the directions of the New Technologies/Innovations of WWI Meme homework assignment. (10 minutes)




Day 5:
A. Anticipatory Set/Into
The students do the following warm-up prediction: Judging from the technology, invention or innovation that you researched last night and the discussions that we have had in class thus far, what other aspects of WWI do you think changed the way that wars had been fought? (10 minutes)                                   

B. Instruction/Through
Students listen to and write down the directions for the activity. (10 minutes)
                                     
D. Independent Practice/Through
The students have 15-20 minutes to go around the classroom and look at the innovations/technologies and create their lists. After the time runs out, have them return to their seats (20-25 minutes)

C. Guided Practice/Through
Students participate in the class discussion and take notes on the inventions that they might want to add. 
                                                                           
E. Closure
Students write their opinions about any of the new weapons or innovations from WWI and write the homework for the night.

12. RESOURCES
(Attach any materials needed to implement the lesson, such as a power point presentation, graphic organizer, reading…)

o   Gandhi (1982) DVD
o   Gandhi (1982) Graphic Organizer
o   4 Causes of WWI Graphic Organizer
o   “Meme”/Captioned Picture Directions
o   Poster Presentation Rubric
o   Short lecture on http://prezi.com/61e4adr7gbyj/nationalism/